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Cinema industry trends
admissions and key events, 1942–1953

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Year Admissions (m) Population (m) Admissions per capita
1943 102.0 7.2 14.1 During World War II, increasing numbers of Australians turned to the cinema for escapism. Between 1942/43 and 1944/45 the number of admissions rose from less than 102 million to 151 million, although once the war ended there was a small decline. In 1942, Greater Union Theatres earned its first substantial profit in over a decade (Shirley & Adams 1983, 170).
1944 147.8 7.3 20.2
1945 151.0 7.4 20.4
1946 143.0 7.5 19.1
1947 136.9 7.6 18.0
1948 133.2 7.7 17.3
1949 129.9 7.9 16.4
1950 129.0 8.2 15.7
1951 134.0 8.4 15.9
1952 140.1 8.6 16.3
1953 137.9 8.8 15.7

Source: See About the data

Notes:
Admission figures for 1944 to 1953 are taken from Smyth (1976, Economic Aspects of Film Distribution and Exhibition in Australia, 211), which sourced the data from the Australian Commissioner of Taxation annual reports. These estimates are based on entertainment tax receipts and exclude admissions for which the ticket price was less than 1/- (see Entertainment taxes as a source of admissions data). Smyth (1976, 20) estimates that total cinema admissions (including admissions under 1/-) for 1950 were 145 million and for 1953 were 138 million.

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