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Historical Data
Business trends
Sources of income

Key sources of income for businesses in the film and video production and post-production services industry, 1999/00, 2002/03 and 2006/07

Next update to be advised


Production income rose from $811.4 million in 2002/03 to $1,132.4 million in 2006/07. Of this, $1,131.2 million was earned by film and video production services businesses.

Comparison between specific categories is problematic as 2006/07 and top-line 2002/03 figures include income from significant non-employing businesses whereas 1999/00 figures and 2002/03 breakdown figures do not (see About the data).

Income from the production of television programs continued to be the largest income source overall (27.1 per cent of total income or $549.7 million in 2006/07), including $139.4 million from adult drama and $41.3 million from children’s drama. The contribution of feature film production rose to 10.5 per cent or $213.7 million in 2006/07, compared to 5 per cent or less in previous years. Income from TV commericals remained relatively steady.

Income from the provision of production services to other businesses decreased from $364 million in 2002/03 to $343.7 million in 2006/07. Of this, $332.3 million was earned by film and video production services businesses. It appears there was a significant drop in producers’ fees to $72 million in 2006/07. In 2002/03, these were worth $126.7 million, not including non-employing businesses.

Income from the provision of post, digital and visual effects (PDV) rose by 14 per cent from $375 million in 2002/03 to $427.6 million in 2006/07 (including $25.3 million from production services businesses). Over half (63.4 per cent) of this income came from visual editing, including animation and visual effects, while sound editing made up 5.3 per cent.

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